Word of the Day

Word of the day

The word for today is…

bonhomie (noun) – A pleasant and affable disposition; geniality.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “Good nature,” 1803, from French bonhomie “good nature, easy temper,” from bonhomme “good man” (with unusual loss of -m-), from bon “good” + homme “man,” from Latin homo.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

homunculus (noun) – 1. A diminutive human.
2. A miniature, fully formed individual believed by adherents of the early biological theory of preformation to be present in the sperm cell.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “Tiny human being produced artificially,” 1650s, from Latin homunculus (plural homunculi), literally “little person,” with -culus, diminutive suffix, + homo (genitive hominis), which technically meant “male human,” but it also was used with a sense “the human race, mankind;” while in Vulgar Latin it could be used as “one, anyone, they, people” and in logical and scholastic writing as “a human being, person.” This is conjectured to be perhaps from PIE ghomon-, literally “earthling,” from *dhghem- “earth”.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

unitarian (noun) – 1. An adherent of Unitarian Universalism.
2. A monotheist who is not a Christian.
3. A Christian who is not a Trinitarian.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1680s, “one who rejects the doctrine of the Trinity,” from Modern Latin unitarius (1650s), from Latin unitas (see unity) + -ian. Applied to Muslims and other non-Christian monotheists, but especially (and with a capital -u-) of a Christian body originally founded upon the doctrine of unipersonality. The American Unitarian Association formed in 1825. As an adjective from 1680s.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

yeasayer (noun) – 1. An uncritical person who usually agrees with proposals
2. an optimistic or positive person

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1915–1920, after naysayer, from yea + say +‎ -er, equivalent to yeasay +‎ -er. First recorded use: 1920.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

emolument (noun) –  Payment for an office or employment; compensation.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Mid-1th 5entury., from Old French émolument “advantage, gain, benefit; income, revenue” (13th century) and directly from Latin emolumentum “profit, gain, advantage, benefit,” perhaps originally “payment to a miller for grinding corn,” from emolere “grind out,” from assimilated form of ex “out” + molere “to grind”.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

draconian (adj) – Exceedingly harsh; very severe

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1876 (earlier Draconic, implied from 1640s), from Draco, Greek statesman who laid down a code of laws for Athens 621 B.C.E. that mandated death as punishment for minor crimes. His name seems to mean literally “sharp-sighted”.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

etiolate (verb) – 1. (Botany) To cause (a plant) to develop without chlorophyll by preventing exposure to sunlight.
2 (a) To cause to appear pale and sickly.
(b) To make weak by stunting the growth or development of.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “Turn (a plant) white by growing it in darkness,” 1791, from French étiolé, past participle of étioler “to blanch” (17cth .entury, perhaps literally “to become like straw,” from Norman dialect étule “a stalk,” Old French esteule “straw, field of stubble,” from Latin stipula “straw”.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

frondescence (adj) –  Bearing, resembling, or having a profusion of leaves or fronds; leafy.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Mid 19th century: from modern Latin frondescentia, from Latin frondescere frequentative of frondere ‘send out leaves’, from frons, frond- ‘leaf’.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

footle (verb) – 1. To waste time; trifle.
2. To talk nonsense.

(noun) – Nonsense; foolishness.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “to trifle,” 1892, from dialectal footer “to trifle,” footy “mean, paltry” (1752), perhaps from French se foutre “to care nothing,” from Old French futer “to copulate with,” from Latin futuere “have sex,” originally “to strike, thrust”. But OED derives the English dialect words from foughty (circa 1600), from Dutch vochtig or Danish fugtig “damp, musty;”.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

xenophobia (noun) –  Fear, hatred, or mistrust of that which is foreign, especially strangers or people from different countries or cultures.

Voted Dictionary.com’s 2016 Word of the Year.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1903, from xeno- “foreign, strange” + -phobia “fear.” Earlier (circa 1884) it meant “agoraphobia.”