Mark Steyn pokes fun at the UN

[Imported from Whale Oil Beef Hooked on Blogger]

The perpetually funny Mark Steyn pokes fun at the UN and UNICEF‘s new anti-war movie in the Daily Telegraph.

This article shows how out of touch the UN bodies are, particularly in relation to Iraq. The movie feature Smurfs, yes thats right the annoying blue things that prance around going la, la, la-la, lah.

Last week, on Belgian television, the UN children’s agency premiered the first adult movie featuring the Smurfs. By “adult”, I don’t mean it was a blue movie. Only the characters were blue. But it was an adult movie in the sense that the Smurfs were massacred during an air strike on their village, until, in the final scene, only Baby Smurf is left, weeping alone surrounded by wall-to-wall Smurf corpses. It’s the first Smurf snuff movie.

Well, I thought, say what you like about the UN, but any organisation that wants to bomb the Smurfs can’t be all bad. Instead of those wimps at Dudley council banning Piglet like a bunch of nancy boys, why couldn’t they make some blockbuster video nuking the Hundred-Acre Wood and leaving Pooh to die in a radioactive Heffalump pit?

My mistake. Apparently Unicef made the short film as a fundraiser to highlight how children are the principal victims of war. As Baby Smurf wails amid the shattered ruins, we see the words: “Don’t let war affect the lives of children.”

Mark then goes on to reveal the hidden message behind the movie and to show that most children affected by war in Africa, Europe etc are not the victims of bombings but rather more intimate and horrific acts that involve machetes and cannibalism. The reality is the movie is targetted against so called Western aggression in Iraq. Steyn goes on the counter the arguements by continuing the ridiculous Smurf analogy, probably so UNICEF can understand the points.

If I were Papa Smurf, I wouldn’t want Baby Smurf to grow up in Saddam’s Iraq. I don’t mean just because we’d be the beleaguered minority of Smurfistan, to be gassed and shovelled into mass graves.

Even if we were part of Saddam’s own approved class living in the Smurfi Triangle, it’s still a life permanently fixed between terror and resignation, in which all a parent’s hopes for his children are subordinate to the whims of a psycho state.

It is interesting to note the distinct lack of coverage of the referendum on the weekend as opposed to the blanket coverage of suicide bombers.

As the Guardian harrumphed on Saturday: “People who opposed the war in Iraq will find it hard to stomach attempts to present the referendum as a triumph.”

Fair enough. For my part, I find it hard to stomach the degrees of support offered to the “insurgency” by George Galloway, John Pilger, Tariq Ali and Michael Moore. But it’s not about what I or the Guardian find hard to stomach. Peripheral though they may be to the concerns of the “peace” crowd, it is in the end about the Iraqi people, and, as with all the previous will-they-won’t-they deadlines, at the eleventh hour they managed to rouse themselves and pull it off.

Sixteen out of Iraq’s 18 provinces – including Sunni-majority ones – voted for the most liberal, democratic, federal and pluralist constitution in the Middle East. Sorry to make the Guardian throw up, but that is indeed a “triumph”.

Finally a return to the Smurf anaolgy.

Sometimes war is worth it. And, if you don’t think so, look at the opening scenes of that Unicef video – Smurfs singing, dancing, gambolling merrily – and try to imagine living in a Smurf enclave in a province that wants to introduce Sharia.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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