They who must not be named

[Imported from Whale Oil Beef Hooked on Blogger]

Mark Steyn in the Chicago Sun-Times has a humourous article about the new Voldemort – Islamic militants.

From Thursday’s New York Times: ”Nalchik, Russia — Insurgents launched a series of raids

“Insurgents,” eh?

From Agence France Presse:”Nalchik, Russia: More than 60 people were killed as scores of militants launched simultaneous attacks…

“Militants,” you say?

From the Scotsman: “Rebel forces battled Russian troops…

“Rebel forces,” huh?

From Toronto’s Globe & Mail: “Nalchik, Russia — Scores of rebels launched…

“Rebels,” by the score. But why were they rebelling? What were they insurging over? You had to pick up the Globe & Mail’s rival, the Toronto Star, to read exactly the same Associated Press dispatch but with one subtle difference:

”Nalchik, Russia — Scores of Islamic militants launched simultaneous attacks on police and government buildings . . .”

Ah, “Islamic militants.” So that’s what the rebels were insurging over. In the geopolitical Hogwart’s, Islamic “militants” are the new Voldemort, the enemy whose name it’s best never to utter. In fairness to the New York Times, they did use the I-word in paragraph seven. And Agence France Presse got around to mentioning Islam in paragraph 22. And NPR’s “All Things Considered” had one of those bland interviews between one of its unperturbable anchorettes and some Russian geopolitical academic type in which they chitchatted through every conceivable aspect of the situation and finally got around to kinda sorta revealing the identity of the perpetrators in the very last word of the geopolitical expert’s very last sentence.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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