Confrontation is a good thing

[Imported from Whale Oil Beef Hooked on Blogger]

Again from Mark Steyn, this time in the Telegraph.

According to The Sunday Telegraph, on this week’s whirlwind tour of the Great Satan, the Prince of Wales “will try to persuade George W Bush and Americans of the merits of Islam…because he thinks the United States has been too intolerant of the religion since September 11”. His Royal Highness apparently finds the Bush approach to Islam “too confrontational”.

If the Prince wants to take a few examples of the non-confrontational approach with him to the White House, here’s a couple pulled at random from the last week’s news: the president of Iran called for Israel to be “wiped off the map”. Kofi Annan expressed his “dismay”.

Excellent. Struck the perfect non-confrontational tone. Were the Iranian nuclear programme a little more advanced and they’d actually wiped Israel off the map, the secretary-general might have felt obliged to be more confrontational and express his “deep concern”.

In Sulawesi, Indonesia, three Christian girls walking home from school were beheaded. “It is unclear what was behind the attack,” reported the BBC, scrupulously non-confrontationally.

In the Australian state of Victoria, reports the Herald Sun, “police are being advised to treat Muslim domestic violence cases differently out of respect for Islamic traditions and habits”. Tough luck for us infidel wife-beaters, but admirably non-confrontational Islam-wise.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.