Egypt imprisons bloggers

Egypt is battling with bloggers and freedom of speech. They are attempting to silence bloggers by imprisoning them.

Earlier this month, Abdel-Karim Suleiman, a 22-year-old former law student at al-Azhar Islamic university, became the first Egyptian jailed for his blogging when he was handed a four-year prison sentence.

His crime?

Suleiman, a Muslim and a liberal who uses the name Kareem Amer on his blog, was based on a complaint by al-Azhar University about eight articles written since 2004.

Suleiman accused the conservative Sunni institution of promoting extremist thought and described some companions of the Prophet Mohammad as "terrorists".

He also compared President Hosni Mubarak to the dictatorial Pharaohs of ancient Egypt.

Wow, name calling gets you 4 years in the pokie in Egypt. I hope Clark doesn’t read this article as she may get ideas.

The international group Reporters Without Borders (RSF) has added Egypt to its list of Internet Black Holes. RSF said one spur for this was a court ruling authorising the Egyptian government to block or suspend any website likely to pose a threat to national security. "This could open the way to extensive online censorship," said RSF in a statement.


Do you want:

  • Ad-free access?
  • Access to our very popular daily crossword?
  • Access to daily sudoku?
  • Access to Incite Politics magazine articles?
  • Access to podcasts?
  • Access to political polls?

Our subscribers’ financial support is the reason why we have been able to offer our latest service; Audio blogs. 

Click Here  to support us and watch the number of services grow.

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

48%