Day 3 of the Great Whaleoil Aussie Trip

We got up nice and early in Bordertown, SA and wandered down to the truckstop for breakfast. Parked at the truckstop ready to move off was a fair dinkum Road "Train". I spoke to the Driver and he said that this was actually quite an easy job for him as the train only weighed 30 tonne and his trailer is rated for 280 tonne. Anyway that was a fuck off big truck. it is funny, because we come all this way and the lady in the truckstop is a Kiwi and the heavy haulage trailer was made in New Zealand. We let the truck leave and it took us over 100km to catch it up, when we did it was travelling at 100km/h with a Police escort. they never even slowed down and just waved us on by. Excellent logistics by the Johnny Hoppers on escort duty.

Breakfast was superb. I had the best bacon I have tasted so far in Australia.

After that we legged it to Adelaide where we are staying at the Adelaide Hyatt Regency. Thankfully it is free, for some reason being the brother of the former F&B Director and now a GM helps. Only a short leg today, we need some supplies and rest before we start the hardest part of the trip.

Tomorrow we go approx 700km to Ceduna and then the day after that it is 1200km in one day across the Nullarbor.

As my FIL says everything is big in Australia. As you can see from the photos they certainly are.

The Roads in SA leave NSW and VIC for dead. They rock and there are no stupid signs to distract you.

now off for some shopping, but Adelaide appears to be stuck in the past and there is fuck all open until after lunch on a Sunday. Word to the wise, don't go to Adelaide on Sunday of you want to shop.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.