Today in History

November 2 – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  • 676 – Donus became Pope.
  • 1772 – American Revolutionary War: Samuel Adams and Joseph Warren form the first Committee of Correspondence.
  • 1783 – In Rocky Hill, New Jersey, US General George Washington gives his "Farewell Address to the Army".
  • 1868 – Time zone: New Zealand officially adopts a standard time to be observed nationally
  • 1889 – North and South Dakota are admitted as the 39th and 40th U.S. states.
  • 1895 – The first gasoline-powered race in the United States. First prize: $2,000
  • 1898 – Cheerleading is started at the University of Minnesota with Johnny Campbell leading the crowd in cheering on the football team.
  • 1899 – The Boers started their 118 day siege of British held Ladysmith during the Second Boer War
  • 1914 – Russia declares war on the Ottoman Empire.
  • 1917 – The Balfour Declaration proclaims support for Jewish settlement in Palestine.
  • 1930 – Haile Selassie is crowned emperor of Ethiopia.
  • 1936 – Italian dictator Benito Mussolini proclaims the Rome-Berlin Axis, establishing the alliance of the Axis Powers.
  • 1936 – the British Broadcasting Corporation initiates the BBC Television Service, the world's first regular, high-definition (then defined as at least 200 lines) service. Renamed BBC1 in 1964, the channel still runs to this day.
  • 1947 – In California, Designer Howard Hughes performs the maiden (and only) flight of the Spruce Goose; the largest fixed-wing aircraft ever built.
  • 1948 – U.S. presidential election, 1948: Harry S. Truman defeats Thomas E. Dewey for the US presidency.
  • 1953 – The Constituent Assembly of Pakistan names the country The Islamic Republic of Pakistan.
  • 1960 – Penguin Books is found not guilty of obscenity in the Lady Chatterley's Lover case
  • 1964 – King Saud of Saudi Arabia was deposed by a family coup, and replaced by his half-brother King Faisal.
  • 1967 – Vietnam War: US President Lyndon B. Johnson and "The Wise Men" conclude that the American people should be given more optimistic reports on the progress of the war.
  • 1968 – Whaleoil was born in Suva, Fiji
  • 1983 – U.S. President Ronald Reagan signs a bill creating Martin Luther King Day, currently the only national holiday honoring an individual American.
  • 1984 – Capital punishment: Velma Barfield becomes the first woman executed in the United States since 1962.
  • 1988 – The Morris worm, the first internet-distributed computer worm to gain significant mainstream media attention, was launched from MIT.
  • 2000 – The first crew arrives at the International Space Station.

Births

  • 1082 – Emperor Huizong of China (d. 1135)
  • 1699 – Jean-Baptiste-Siméon Chardin, French painter (d. 1779)
  • 1709 – Anne, Princess Royal and Princess of Orange (d. 1759)
  • 1734 – Daniel Boone, American frontiersman (d. 1820)
  • 1815 – George Boole, English mathematician and philosopher (d. 1864)
  • 1844 – Mehmed V, Ottoman Sultan (d. 1918)
  • 1865 – Warren G. Harding, 29th President of the United States (d. 1923)
  • 1877 – Joseph De Piro, Maltese founder of the Missionary Society of St. Paul (d. 1933)
  • 1877 – Aga Khan III, Shia Imam (d. 1957)
  • 1893 – Battista Farina, founder of Pininfarina company (d. 1966)
  • 1913 – Burt Lancaster, American actor (d. 1994)
  • 1929 – Richard E. Taylor, American physicist, Nobel Prize laureate
  • 1937 – Earl Carroll, lead vocalist of The Cadillacs
  • 1938 – Pat Buchanan, American journalist and politician
  • 1938 – Queen Sofia of Spain
  • 1941 – Bruce Welch, English musician and songwriter (The Shadows)
  • 1942 – Shere Hite, American author
  • 1942 – Stefanie Powers, American actress
  • 1944 – Keith Emerson, British keyboardist and composer (Emerson, Lake & Palmer)
  • 1946 – Alan Jones, Australian race car driver
  • 1968 – Whaleoil, New Zealand Blogger
  • 1977 – Jason Cerbone, American actor (The Sopranos)

Deaths

  • 943 – Queen Emma of France, (b. 894)
  • 1083 – Matilda of Flanders, Queen consort (b. 1031)
  • 1285 – King Peter III of Aragon (b. 1239)
  • 1327 – King James II of Aragon (b. 1267)
  • 1483 – Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham, English politician (b. 1454)
  • 1610 – Richard Bancroft, Archbishop of Canterbury (b. 1544)
  • 1618 – Archduke Maximilian III of Austria (b. 1568)
  • 1950 – George Bernard Shaw, Irish writer, Nobel Prize laureate (b. 1856)
  • 1963 – Ngô Đình Diệm, President of South Vietnam (b. 1901)
  • 2004 – Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahayan, President of the United Arab Emirates (b. 1918)
  • 2004 – Theo van Gogh, Dutch filmmaker (b. 1957)

Powered by ScribeFire.


Do you want:

  • Ad-free access?
  • Access to our very popular daily crossword?
  • Access to daily sudoku?
  • Access to Incite Politics magazine articles?
  • Access to podcasts?
  • Access to political polls?

Our subscribers’ financial support is the reason why we have been able to offer our latest service; Audio blogs. 

Click Here  to support us and watch the number of services grow.

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

40%