Should all music sharing be free?

Mashable has excerpts from their interview with Free software activist Richard Stallman.

Stallman started the Free Software Foundation based on four principles.

  1. Information, such as computer software, should be freely accessible.
  2. The information should be free to modify.
  3. The information should be free to share with others.
  4. The information should be free to change and redistribute copies of the changed software.

While not all of these principles apply to music, he says, some of them should apply. And a lot of music fans musicians tend to agree with him. In many ways, the corporate side of the music industry’s attitude toward musical content mimics Microsoft’s or Adobe’s or Apple’s attitude toward software. This attitude often does nothing to help those who create or those who enjoy the content in question; it does everything to make money for the corporations who oversee licensing and purchase fees.

There are interesting comments about the actual creators of content, the artists and how little money they actually get from the selling of music. I like some of his ideas, if only the industry haters and wreckers could see past their bricks and mortar mentality.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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