The HoS crystal ball gazing

The Herald on Sunday has been crystal ball gazing. There are two notable commentaries.

The first is from Kieran Nash who seems to be busily making a name for himself as a political correspondent without the lefty baggage of Bernard Orsman or Brian Rudman. He writes about Jami-Lee Ross.

Jami-Lee Ross-the rising star

Age is just a number for Jami-Lee Ross. The 25-year-old has put his hand up to represent National in this year’s Botany by-election, which was left vacant after MP Pansy Wong resigned her post last month.

Ross faces two challenges – the first, being selected by the party, then secondly to be elected by the people. If successful, he will be the youngest MP in Parliament.

Ross, despite his relative youth, is already an experienced politician, having served two terms at the now-defunct Manukau City Council and his current role as Super City councillor makes him the city’s youngest.

“I suppose it’s unusual for a young person to get involved in politics,” says Ross.

“The work I did must have paid off because [his ward] re-elected me two times now.

Yes Jami-lee has developed a habit of winning. His youth, which some detractors are mouthing off about is actually just his physical age. I’ve known Jami-lee for quite a few years, actually since he was 18 and newly elected, and he has always impressed me with a political, world view age much more advanced than his physical age would suggest.

Ross has also been one of the more vocal members of the Auckland Council, and was a thorn in then-Manukau Mayor Len Brown’s side over credit card misspending spending last year.

He’s a fan of saying what he thinks: “I don’t believe in simply being a nodding head.”

Ross says this year will be busy and although he can’t say for sure, he hopes to be selected.

“I never take anything for granted in elections and it will be another campaign.”

Good thing that…never ever take selections or elections for granted. You have to work hard to earn people’s vote and keeping it is just as much work. If you lose their confidence then it is curtains for sure.

Bryce Edwards, in the same article comments on the influentials. For some reason he puts Captain Panic Pants, Kevin Taylor.

Kevin Taylor-John Key’s Chief Press Secretary

Previously a New Zealand Herald reporter, Taylor is now the top spin doctor in New Zealand politics, and is credited with helping to keep Key’s popularity at all-time highs. He’s done this by filtering out most of the radical and unpopular policy proposals within the current Government – his nickname in the Beehive is “Captain Panic Pants” because of his extremely risk-averse nature.

This year, Taylor will therefore be making sure that Key and the Government don’t put a foot wrong before the public go to the polls.

I have to respectfully disagree with Bryce Edwards there. Kevin Taylor is no Bevan Burgess and certainly not even remotely close to Mike Munro in his skill levels.

If Captain Panic Pants is so good why did we get ACC, Mining on Schedule 4 and other silly distractions? Under the control of Kevin Taylor, National has no coherent message with their media. The media across ministers departments are in silos with almost no co-ordination with key ministers as a result no-one knows what John Key actually stands for other than wanting to be PM and being relaxed.

Yep, so, have to disagree with Bryce on that one.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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