Is the National Party List Ranking Process in Breach of the Constitution?

Rule 127 (b) has some guidance to the National Party about how it should run the list ranking process.

Regions shall arrange three (3) meetings in different parts of the Region to enable delegates to the Regional Conference to meet all available nominees in the period prior to the Regional Conference List Selection meeting. These meetings shall be conducted in the same manner as provided for in Rule 102.

The last of these meetings may be held at a time immediately preceding the commencement of the Regional Conference at which List Selection procedures will be undertaken.

National’s selection process has been held up by the Rangitikei selection and the Epsom selection. So the regional conferences are finished and the list ranking process prescribed by the constitution has not been followed.

This creates a potential problem for National. If someone doesn’t like their list position can they challenge the process? Or can an ordinary member challenge the process because they did not get to vote at their regional conference?

To be fair I have to feel sorry for Peter Goodfellow who is obviously under pressure with legal action, a tough business environment and Don Brash’s mates giving generously to ACT not to National.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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