Labour Leaks – Go to the Privacy Commissioner

Apparently Labour is appealing to the Privacy Commissioner….not sure that is the right term, imploring? begging? perhaps.

Labour is appealing to the privacy commissioner about lists of supporters and donors falling into the hands of a right-wing blogger.

Details of 18,000 people were on the databases downloaded by blogger Cameron Slater, severely embarrassing Labour, which had to email donors and people who had contacted it through its website to apologise for the breach.

Slater has revealed on his blog how he obtained the databases, which appear to have been publicly available and easy to download without needing to hack into the site.

He has threatened to reveal any conflicts of interest, potentially compromising Labour supporters in sensitive positions who have contacted it in support of its Stop Asset Sales campaign and others.

Some of the information downloaded includes lists on which there had been communication on other issues – for example, the increasing cost of early childhood education.

I sincerely hope that Labour is doing more than appealing. They should be laying a complaint against me. So far I have released only one name, but I can release more than 18,000 anytime I please. The more they keep lying and spinning the more inclined I am to prove them wrong.

Private Sign do Not readThey continue to put out their ridiculous spin about National helping me, or abetting me, or just plain talking to me. It is ridiculous, even Trevor Mallard thinks I work for ACT and Don Brash and I certainly wouldn’t have trusted any of this information with the muppets at National’s head office.

It matters not who accessed Labour’s data. That is missing the point. The important point here, which I am sure the Privacy Commissioner will go to great lengths to point out is that Labour is the one who is in the gun here, it is them that broke the law and it is them that needs to start being honest with the members and donors about their poor security.

Labour mentions that they fixed the problem when they found it on Saturday. This is untrue as well. They were alerted to the problem by David Fisher asking questions on Saturday night. The site was still open at 0900 on Sunday morning. I know because I have screenshots of it. So far all Labour has done is lie. Time and again I have proved their lies.

Labour needs to own their problem and not go blaming other people for their screw ups. This is a systemic failure on their part, they know it, we know it and they should just own it. To use silly descriptors like “politically motivated” shows just how pathetic they are. Of course my actions were politically motivated. It involved a political party, all their members and some of their donors, why wouldn’t it be politically motivated.

The last word about my alleged involvement with National or that they are my pay-masters (how can that reconcile with Labours attacks about me being a beneficiary?) or controllers really rests with Peter Goodfellow:

National had no interest in Labour’s information of that kind and was not looking for it.

“We don’t condone that sort of behaviour at all.”

He declined to comment on Slater or his actions.

“I don’t have any control over him. If you see what he has written about me you would probably say I probably don’t have any control over him. I mean you are talking to the wrong guy there,” he said.

Damn right they have no control over me, no one does, not even me.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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