Random Impertinent Question

Why do we have a beggar problem at all?

Palmerston North is moving to rid the city of beggars before the Rugby World Cup.

Its police are supporting calls from angry business owners to rid the city centre of beggars including a potential bylaw that could empower police to prosecute any beggars who do not leave the CBD.

But a local beggar says the plan could force beggars to shift to Whanganui or Wellington, or switch to crime.

The city council will discuss the best way to move beggars from outside shops on Broadway Ave and The Square at a committee meeting on Monday. Options include introducing a bylaw allowing police to “move people on” if found begging and prosecute them if they do not comply. Current rules only allow them to take action against beggars who demand money with menace.

Similar plans are not on the cards in other New Zealand centres, though some do acknowledge they will “move along” beggars who become a problem during the World Cup.

Auckland Council has given city agencies an extra $20,000 funding to be used for “the security and support of the homeless” during the cup.

If people are living on the street and begging, then it is through choice. We have a welfare system that apparently, according to the whiny left is the envy of the world.

There is no excuse other than indolence, substance abuse or choice for there to be beggars.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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