Spinning crap

Tracy Watkins spins that National party members are upset about “asset sales”.

She was obviously at a different conference to me, when only two people out of a room of over 400 asked questions. Her contention is wrong but it doesn;t stop from spinning. Of course the difference between the National party and other parties is that delegates are able to feel comfortable

State asset sales are proving to be a bone of contention even within National’s own ranks as its grassroots members question whether crucial assets will be flogged off overseas.

The government has struggled to reassure Kiwis that its plan to sell a 49 per cent stake in the remaining state owned power companies won’t see them end up in foreign ownership.

But it also appears to have done a poor selling job among its own members with Finance Minister Bill English facing questions from party members during a public session of the National Party conference in Wellington today.

Mr English said the government was working on ways to ensure Kiwi investors were at the front of the queue but acknowledged there was no way to stop them selling shares to overseas buyers.

This was shortly before the media up sticks and bolted before lunch.

Of course the difference between the National party and other parties is that delegates are able to feel comfortable, even in a stage managed event such as this conference, to stand upa nd voice a contrarian opinion. That is to be welcomed. Political sycophancy should be avoided assiduously.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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