Nothing less than a scandal, Ctd

Earlier today I continued my exposure of the NZEI and NZPF dirty tricks using schools and children to force their political views.

It appears that their strategy of hijacking school newsletters fro political aims has been in place since at least 2009. (Screenshot in case they remove the page)

This si nothing less than a scandal of a union hijacking school newsletters in a long standing campaign to subject parents and children to their political viewpoints.

The website lists at least 6 examples.

 


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  • Petal

    I’m with you on this in general, but if you think it through, a principal should be able to have an opinion and express it. What if this is done on a separate piece of paper? And in that case, what’s the difference, really, with just using a space in the newsletter.

    • Eric

      @Petal. As an employee, If you don’t like what your Employer wants done, you have choices. Most people respect the fact that they are in the operational arm of the organisation and do it, however you can dislike it but do it (keep your opinions private), But if you feel strongly that the Governance of the organisation is wrong, you resign. Personal opinions about policy must be put aside and should not be put in a public forum if you are a representative of the organisation (as a principal is in a newsletter) . Another principal without principles. Any other industry it would be serious misconduct.

      • Petal

        Fair call. I agree.

  • Anonymous

    I posted this on newsgroup nz.general earlier today. I am quite sure if the Principal of that school made these sorts of comments in a newsletter, the Board chair would be down like a ton of bricks.
    [Quote]
    Hear that a high decile primary school is chewing through Principals
    at a fair rate of knots because they allegedly cannot work with the
    Board. Seems the Board chair knows how to push things short of some
    Ministry official declaring the Board ‘dysfunctional’ and appointing a
    commissioner.

    In other words usual corporate rules are applying, the CEO of the
    school is expected to work within the governance policies set by the
    Board and cannot unilaterally try and white-ant National Standards
    etc. Similarly the Board is fully aware of the legal and Government
    policy environment in which the school has to function.

    Latest appointee is already on staff and knows full well the
    aspirations and expectations of the Board, and no doubt the Board is
    confident that the appointee will deliver accordingly.

    About 100 years ago, the same school was concerned about discipline
    standards and the then School Committee appointed an Auckland Grammar
    teacher as Headmaster. He had been asked to leave Grammar for being
    too hard on the boys.

    Tomorrow’s Schools – working as it should.
    [unquote]

  • Miss

    You know the great thing about education in New Zealand (until Anne Tolley and the current National government came along) is that it fostered free thinking.
    The great thing about New Zealand also is the ability to freely speak and protest.
    Perhaps this is something we need to value more as we watch the people of Yemen and Syria fight for these rights and the right for a democratic government.
    Right now, I see our current government erroding these basic rights, and that they intend to use the education system to implement it.
    Well I won’t let our country go down this road, and I won’t let a job I love be dumbed down and have all the creativity and problem solving taken out of it. I refuse to teach to the test and tell children they have failed.
    I insist on developing a well rounded child, developing their strengths and fostering a love of learning and a desire to solve problems.
    If you want to see what that is like, my classroom door is open.

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