The five stages of political death

An adaptation on a theme.

Trevor Mallard has been especially foul the last few weeks and it got me thinking about what is the root cause.  Trevor is clearly going through the 5 stages of political death.  I have take the attached off the internet and modified a little to reflect the stages of political death and what Trevor Mallard in particular is going through.  Some have managed to Move on – in particular Clark and Cullen, and soon Pete Hodgson and others that are retiring. SDome will be forced to move on by the results of the election.

But old troughers such as Mallard, Goff, King, and others who have refused to leave, hang in there, knowing for them they are unemployable in the real world.

They know all they have to look forward to is the dole queue.

Political Death is a somewhat complicated and misunderstood emotion. Yet, Political death is something that, fortunately, the Labour Party must experience in order for them to be reborn. Trevor Mallard will inevitably experience that loss.

There are five stages of Political Death. Labour have been stuck in the denial stage, and  the process of grieving is not complete (in fact it has barely started).  Thus there will be no healing and no re-birth of the Labour Party. The Labour Party MUST go through the five stages to be reborn,  to heal from the scars of the Clark dictatorship. Not every political Party goes through the stages at the same time.

We on the right cannot force the Labour Party to go through the stages, they have to go at their own pace, and they  may go one step forward then take two steps backward, but this is all part of the process, and individual to each Party and people within the party such as the foul Trevor Mallard. But, as stressed, ALL five stages must be completed for healing to occur.

The five stages of political death  are:

1. Denial – “this can’t be happening to me”, looking for the former Leader in familiar places, or if it is death, txting the person and acting as if they are still leading the Labour Party. Not accepting or even acknowledging the loss.

2. Anger – “why me?”, feelings of wanting to fight back or get even with the Dear Leader, for leaving, anger at the current leader, blaming them for rotten polling, lack of traction.

3. Bargaining – Bargaining often takes place before the loss. Attempting to make deals with the Leaders in waiting, with opposition political parties, unions, teachers and baseline support demographics who are deserting Labour in droves, those who are leaving, or attempting to make deals with God to stop or change the loss. Begging, wishing, praying for them to come back.

4. Depression – overwhelming feelings of hopelessness, frustration, bitterness, self pity, mourning loss of the Dear Leader. and the political party that once was,  as well as the hopes, dreams and plans for the future. Feeling lack of control, feeling numb. Perhaps feeling complete and utter hopelessness.

5. Acceptance – there is a difference between resignation and acceptance. You have to accept the loss, not just try to bear it quietly. Realization that it takes more than one make or break a party. Realization that the person is gone (in death) that it is not their fault, they didn’t leave you on purpose. (even in cases of electoral suicide, often the deceased politician, was not in their right frame of mind) Finding the good that can come out of the pain of loss, finding comfort and healing. Our goals turn toward personal growth. Stay with fond memories of person/party.

Get help Trevor and Labour. You will survive. You will heal, even if you cannot believe that now, just know that it is true. To feel pain after loss is normal. It proves that we are alive, human.

But Labour can’t stop living. They  have to become stronger, while not shutting off their feelings for the hope of one day being healed and finding the love and/or happiness of the people again. Helping others through something we have experienced is a wonderful way to facilitate our healing and bring good out of something tragic.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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