Bribes don’t work

Electoral bribes don’t work:

THEY’RE Parliament’s billion-dollar men – between them securing almost $1 billion in new funding for their electorates in just over a year. But despite it all, they are in dire danger of losing their jobs.

Tony Windsor and Rob Oakeshott – two of the three independents who supported Julia Gillard to form government – have won a list of projects for their regional NSW electorates, already totalling more than $820 million by the Herald‘s calculation and with announcements on another $1.1 billion in regional spending still to come.

Their agreement to form government guaranteed the pair – and their fellow independent Andrew Wilkie – three grants worth $456 million, more than a third of the total $1.3 billion handed out in a special ”regional priority” round of the Health and Hospitals Infrastructure Fund, once the projects met certain criteria.

The other 111 grant proposals from around the country that also met the criteria, together requesting more than $2 billion, had to fight it out for the remaining $840 million.

But according to the latest Newspoll, despite the largesse and special treatment, Mr Windsor and Mr Oakeshott have suffered a dramatic decline in support, with voters in their electorates overwhelmingly opposing their decision to vote for the carbon pricing scheme.

Bribes don’t work, just like here where NZ decided against more bribes from helen in 2008, and doesn’t seem to be listening to Phil’s bribes in 2011


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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