Five Fingers Feeley has to go

Jared Savage has what surely must be the last nail in Adam Feeley’s coffin:

The head of the Serious Fraud Office gave copies of Allan Hubbard’s biography as “booby” prizes at a staff Christmas party while the former Rich Lister was under investigation.

Adam Feeley, the SFO chief executive, gave handcrafted wooden statues to winners at a joke prize-giving last December and paperback editions of “Allan Hubbard: A Man Out of Time” to the runners-up.

At the time, Mr Hubbard’s South Canterbury Finance was in statutory management after a $1.8 billionGovernment bailout and the Timaru accountant was being investigated by the SFO.

Six months after the Christmas party, the SFO laid 50 charges against the 83-year-old, who denied any wrongdoing.

The calls for his resignation are growing:

Pressure has mounted on Mr Feeley this week and yesterday, a top Auckland criminal lawyer called for his resignation over the champagne incident.

“He’s in a position of responsibility and I think he’s shown absolutely poor judgment,” said Criminal Bar Association president Tony Bouchier.

“They had a celebratory drink – that on its own is not so bad, but the SFO really have got to be seen to be absolutely unbiased.”

This latest incident just shows that the culture at the SFO under Adam Feeley has deteriorated significantly. THere can only be one person responsible for that.

 


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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