Moaning Oldies

Good grief, who uses a phone book these days anyway, about the only thing they are useful for is a target backstop for the kids air rifle:

A Lower Hutt man with eyesight problems says optometrists are likely to be big winners from Wellington’s incredible new shrinking telephone book.

The new directories with smaller pages were delivered to Wellington homes last week.

The books contain the same number of lines on each page but the print size has been cut significantly to make them fit.

Angus Gibb, 65, said he could not read the new directory without a magnifying glass. Ironically, the only page he could clearly read was the back cover, which contained a bold type advertisement for Specsavers.

“Optometrists and magnifying glass sales people will be the real winners.”

Mr Gibb, who has eyesight problems, described the new publication as a form of “elder abuse”.

Older people, who would not be able to read the phone book, would have to pay for the 018 directory service to obtain phone numbers, he said.

“Many older people are not computer literate. They can’t use the whitepages.co.nz computer search service.

“The small print size in the new publication makes it look as though the publishers don’t want people to use the phone book any more.”

Grey Power Wellington president Duncan McDonald, 72, described the new Wellington phone books as a form of “discrimination” against elderly people.

“I obtained a new phone book late last week and I can’t read it without my glasses on.”

Mr McDonald called on the phone book publishers, a company called Yellow, to consider older people before publishing next year’s phone books.

Oh right, just what we need, large print phone books! I’m pretty sure they are considering older people in their demographics for the phone book, probably in the category of grumpy, old, blind and can’t use a computer…stuff all in that group, make it smaller.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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