Someone should tell then the law has changed

Community Magistrate Lavinia Nathan needs to read up on the new law regarding name suppression:

A man has pleaded guilty to 22 separate charges of filming up women’s skirts at shopping malls.

He will be sentenced in the North Shore District Court in December on charges of making 22 intimate visual recordings.

The Herald on Sunday cannot name him or show his face because Community Magistrate Lavinia Nathan granted him interim name suppression – again.

Police said there were no “known” victims because he discreetly filmed strangers below their waists from front-on and behind. He was caught at Albany’s Westfield Centre after a security guard alerted police.

The 41-year-old West Auckland man was allowed to keep his identity a secret for two weeks after his guilty plea to inform his sick elderly mother about his offending, which took place over three months.

This week however, Public Defence Solicitor Liesje Garraway-Lina requested the interim name suppression be continued for another seven weeks because he had not informed his employer or other family members, including a young daughter.

Police prosecutor Mike Hayden said her argument held no weight because the offender had already had enough time to let people know about his charges.

Community Magistrate Nathan decided to protect the offender by hiding his identity until sentencing.

The law has changed now and there is no way that this man remotely qualifies under the new provisions for name suppression to enjoy continued name suppression.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.