Cosgrove and Street openly fighting

I saw a very strange article in the Nelson Mail, where is appears Maryan Street and Clayton Cosgrove are having a wee tiff:

Ms Street made the promise at a New Zealand Educational Institute-organised election candidates meeting in Stoke on Monday night, and when asked yesterday she said she did not resile from it.

Her stance appears to be stronger than that of Labour’s law and order spokesman Clayton Cosgrove, who while also proposing repeal has left some room for movement if Labour forms the next government.

The Sentencing and Parole Reform Act, known as the three-strikes law, was passed last year, and mandates that judges impose harsher sentences on repeat offenders.

Offenders are sentenced and eligible for parole for strike one, sentencing remains the same, but rights to parole and an early release from jail are taken away for strike two.

On the third strike, offenders pay the maximum price for the crime committed. For murderers that is life in prison with no chance of parole.

Mr Cosgrove said if elected the party would “back what works and review what doesn’t”, and it would take “something seismic” to convince him to keep the law.

But Ms Street said that a repeal would be a definite step in a Labour-led government.

“He [Mr Cosgrove] said that we would need very, very good evidence about why we should retain it, so I just flipped that round the other way and said that we would repeal it,” she told theNelson Mail yesterday.

“For me, it is a stupid piece of legislation; it takes away the discretionary powers of judges, which are very useful at times in determining harsher sentences depending on circumstances.”

To be fair to Clayton he knows what happens when you go up against The Crusher. Maryan Street is yet to find out what it feels like when that sttely gazes rests upon you. I suspect she will find out pretty soon after November 26 if she continues to oppose “three strikes”.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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