Is Pizza exempt under Labour’s GST policy?

You might think that this is a silly thing to ask, but it isn’t really. In the US pizza is a vegetable.

Polis mentioned French fries in reference to a provision in the bill that would have blocked the government from limiting servings of white potatoes to one cup per week in meals served through the roughly $18 billion US school meals program overseen by the US Department of Agriculture.

In addition to potatoes, USDA also proposed limits on starchy vegetables including corn, green peas and lima beans, while requiring lunches to serve a wider variety of fruit and vegetables.

Another provision bars the USDA from changing the way it credits tomato paste, used in pizza. The change would have required pizza to have at least a half-cup of tomato paste to qualify as a vegetable serving. Current rules, which likely will remain in place, require just two tablespoons of tomato paste.

So in the US if a pizza has two tablespoons of tomato paste on it then it qualifies as a vegetable. Under the Trans-Pacific Partnership it theoretically could end up that Pizza is a vegetable through the homogenisation fo rules and standards and therefore under Labour’s GST policy ould be exempt from GST.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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