Labour’s Land Hypocrisy

When David Shearer stood at the gate of one of the clapped out Crafar Farms did he consider for even a minute that the farms were already owned by an overseas company and were ever since Alan Crafar defaulted on his loans to Westpac Bank, which correct me if I am mistaken, but I thought they were Australian.

But as long as they aren’t Chinee, Labour is fine with selling rural land:

During its nine years in power, Labour allowed 650,000ha to be sold; in 20 months National has approved the sale of 31,000ha.

Trevor Mallard thinks that Shearer gets a free pass though because he wasn’t an MP and so Labour’s past misdeeds don’t carry through.

Fran O’Sullivan schools Shearer and Mallard hard:

Labour’s Trevor Mallard has joined the fray opposing the Chinese bid. But it’s notable that he has not challenged any of the successful “Anglo Saxon” bidders for NZ farm land such as German investors, US and Australian investors. No dairy farms have yet to be sold to Chinese buyers. Penqxin also has extensive agriculture investments in South America and elsewhere.

Something Mallard omits to say is the Crafar farms are diddley squat in size and value compared to the amount of farm land that was sold offshore during the Clark reign. The Real Estate Institute said yesterday that rural property sales had a strong finish in 2011, reflecting good growing conditions across the country.

The institute pointed to the emergence of offshore buyers, mainly from Europe, acquiring properties in both Canterbury and other regions, although “this comes after extensive due diligence and securing OIO approvals in the six to 12 months prior”.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.