$400M cost to economy to Mondayise holidays

Labour politicians really know how to wreck an economy.

The Department of Labour has advised the Government against “Mondayising” Anzac and Waitangi Day holidays when they fall on the weekend, citing economic costs of up to $400 million.

Prime Minister John Key this afternoon said he’d now received advice from the Department of Labour on the issue after Labour MP David Clark’s Members Bill, which would give workers a holiday the following Monday when Anzac or Waitangi Day fell on the weekend, was drawn from a parliamentary ballot last week.

The advice pointed out that the next time either day fell on a weekend was in 2015 and it was not until 2021 that both Anzac and Waitangi Day fell on a weekend in the same year.

The department had told Mr Key the cost to the economy for an individual day if Mondayised was $200 million or $400 million in a year when both were Mondayised.

“The recommendation from the Department of Labour is not to Mondayise them,” Mr Key said.

it is bad enough that Len Brown is intent on wrecking the Auckland economy with 13 new tax ideas, but David Clark’s $400 million sting to Kiwi businesses really needs to be ignored.

If Labour wants to wreck the economy in this way then let them do it from the government benches when they eventually return to power.

National meanwhile should stay well away for it.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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