A good idea for Hekia to implement

Hekia Parata should bring in this development to the education sector:

UNDERPERFORMING teachers will be sacked in a landmark education reform that will be rolled out nationally.

In return for signing the federal government’s teacher hiring policy, aimed at improving standards, the O’Farrell government will be offered a handout of more than $12 million.

In a move that will break the long-standing deadlock about whether principals can hire and fire, school management will be given free rein on recruitment and management of teachers and support staff.

School boards and councils will also take over budget control and strategic planning, giving parents a greater role in school operations. They will also be given the right to set salaries for teachers and contracts for school maintenance.

“To get the best results we need principals to have the powers to get and keep the best teachers,” Prime Minister Julia Gillard told The Daily Telegraph yesterday.

I wonder if David Shearer will adopt this Labor party policy.

 


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  • Blip

    Do we sack underperforming lawyers, doctors, engineers and architects too? What about journos?

    • If we don’t, we should. I think you’ll find that the private sector doesn’t tolerate useless employees. Doctors have stringent controls on them, obviously, as their patients’ lives depend on it.

    • Hakimofphut

      You cant make the kids learn ! . Or even attend school… or listen…or stay awake

      • Thorn

        What changed?

  • Anonymous

    I’m going to stick up for Kosh a bit here and say that before this could be implemented, the framework for performance assessment needs to be properly ironed out and implemented. And input from teachers is necessary.

    • Petal

      It’s not hard.  You get set a number of KPIs.  Hit them – you’re a winner.  Make a mess of it, you go into a process offering help in upskilling.  Continue to miss KPIs, you’re gone burger.

      It’s what the private sector does well enough.  And yes, there are travesties of justice and common sense there every day.

      But somehow I prefer that over some tenured 30+er, jaded, tired and not giving a shit warming a seat while brilliant young minds are not all they can be.

      And judging by some of the newer teachers coming along, the standards to entry aren’t high enough yet either.  Just because you passed your courses doesn’t make you a good teacher.

      I would like to see it a requirement that kids that have gone from school into teacher’s college are not allowed to become teachers until they have some kind of real-world experience they can bring to the job as well.  Some of the new teachers are still children themselves and have. no. idea. how. the. real. world. works.

      (wow.. I’m feeling better now.  time for lunch)

      • Anonymous

        I just think that the sudden implementation of this kind of policy would be too much of an upheaval for the kids (channelling Reverend Lovejoy’s wife…won’t someone please think of the children! lol) 

        I agree, KPI tracking works well in the private sector and should be implemented but perhaps in a staggered roll out rather than a sudden hit. Ultimately, Kosh is a little bit right – the private sector model can’t be dumped on schools and expected to work, it needs to be adapted and adjusted to suit the non-profit model but I firmly believe it is possible. Not sure if many of you are aware but NZ is quite different from most countries in that our accounting standards have always been ‘sector neutral’ meaning the same standards apply to private enterprise and public entities. With the introduction of IFRS (International Financial Reporting Standards) we are seeing no end of difficulty with PBO (public benefit organisation) compliance because they are simply so different. The challenge is finding a meaningful and cost efficient combination of the two areas. PBO’s (including schools) have lived in a bubble for too long, and have not been forced to adapt like every other part of the world. At least afford them the same courtesy (i.e. an acceptable timeline and consultancy) that the private sector got. It’s an evolution of ideas, rather than a quick fix, that will solve our public sector problems.

        What the hell is wrong with me…I’m sticking up for teachers! I’m going to the pub to shake off this weird feeling that’s come over me all of a sudden :)

  • Ben E. Basha

    Sarrs, input from teachers will only mean moaning and slogans from NZEI et al.
    Petal, agreed,  esp the old teacher comment.

    • Anonymous

      Yea they will moan their arses off…but you should have heard the pissing and moaning from my co-workers when we moved from manual workpapers to electronic ones. Now they wouldn’t be doing without them and they’re moaning about something else. The key is to introduce things in a timeline instead of all at once…that way, something else comes up that they can moan about and they forget the first one. Never underestimate peoples’ love of moaning!

    • Kosh103

      And this is why you have problems. To exclude teachers from ANY process like this would be an amazingly stupid thing to do.

  • Kosh103

    Unless they take into account all the outside influences – learning issues, behaviour issues, home life etc…  – it is an unworkable and stupid idea.

  • Anonymous

    Seems good. Giving school management more flexibility – sounds good to me. 

  • Ionmannz

    Um,
    actually most of the points above …. “In a move that will break the long-standing
    deadlock about whether principals can hire and fire, school management will be
    given free rein on recruitment and management of teachers and support staff.

    School boards and councils will also take over
    budget control and strategic planning, giving parents a greater role in school
    operations.”

    already happen in NZ Schools. It was adopted in 1989 when “tomorrows
    schools” was implemented by David Lange. In NZ teachers and support staff are hired
    and fired locally- ie by the Board and Principal. This already happens in NZ.
    Staff are not appointed by central govt. And budgets and control is done by
    local School Boards.

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