Another Judge that needs sacking

Any Judge that quotes “The Spirit Level” while pronouncing that hugs and cuddle for criminals is preferable to being tough needs to be sacked, forthwith.

The head of the country’s Youth Court has warned that New Zealand’s “world-leading” youth justice system is under threat from those who want it to be “tougher”.

Judge Andrew Becroft told a seminar on youth issues at Auckland University yesterday that calls for tougher sentences, which had led to constant changes in the adult justice system in the past 20 years, had “thankfully” not touched youth justice.

But he said the youth justice system was also “under threat from a simplistic call for more toughness”.

“You ask yourself: where does the toughness end? What sort of toughness is considered sufficient?

…The judge said he now saw “pockets of a third-generation permanent underclass throughout New Zealand”.

“That’s not to say that everyone who is poor or disadvantaged offends, but it’s a hugely high risk factor. That’s one of the reasons why 79 per cent have a care and protection history. That really worries me.”

He referred to the recently published book The Spirit Level which showed that countries with the highest inequality, including New Zealand, also had the lowest levels of child wellbeing and other measures of social cohesion.

If Justice Minister Judith Collins is making a list, then she should put Judge Andrew Becroft on it.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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