Botulism kills more birds than Rena

Remember all the fuss over the 1000 birds that died from the oil spill as a result of the MV Rena running aground?

Check out the liars at Greenpeace, they still claim that:

The Rena has left a real mark on our national consciousness. It also left a very real mark on the Bay of Plenty coast. The Bird Recovery Centre estimates that so far up to 20,000 birds have been killed by the Rena’s fuel oil. The death toll amongst other wildlife, like whales, seals and fish, will likely never be known. Fishing and dive tour operators have been hit hard by the accident – the Rena hit one of the Bay’s best diving spots.

Maritime New Zealand has the real numbers not the lies of Greenpeace:

A total of 2118 dead birds were found in the six weeks after the Rena grounded in October and spilt an estimated 350 tonnes of oil. Two thirds of these dead birds (about 1400) were oiled. Of these, nearly 1000 had oil over more than 50 percent of their bodies.

But things are way worse for the poor birds of New Zealand and it isn’t from oil from the MV Rena.

A suspected avian botulism outbreak in Christchurch’s wetlands has killed more than 4000 birds, taking the death toll to above that from the Rena oil spill.

Increased sewage levels in the Bromley oxidation ponds, the Avon-Heathcote Estuary and the eastern wetlands caused by the earthquake may be responsible for the outbreak, according to a conservation officer.

In an email obtained by The Press, council ornithologist Andrew Crossland told council staff and conservation organisations that more than 10 per cent of the area’s population had died due to the outbreak.

The email, which used figures from December 20 last year, said that 3877 dead birds had been collected in the area.

The worst-affected species were the paradise shelduck, which lost more than 85 per cent of its population (1415 birds), the mallard/grey duck (49 per cent, or 385 birds), and the grey teal duck (13 per cent, or 495 birds).

The deaths meant there would be a “substantial decrease in numbers” in Avon-Heathcote and Bromley, as well as at “source areas and migration/dispersal destinations”.

Several other significant species, including the scaup, shoveler and royal spoonbill, had also been suffered losses, “but not at levels that the population can’t recover from in one to three years”.

Perhaps Lucy Lawless and the rest of her lying Greenpeace cohorts might like to climb down off the ship they are currently illegally occupying and haul their arses to Christchurch to save Ducks from botulism.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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