But do they stop skiddies?

The US Army has developed kevlar grundies for combat:

When it comes to the many “life-changing” injuries that can result from an IED blast, the loss of a limb is probably the first one that springs to mind. But injuries to the pelvic region that leave soldiers with the inability to have children can obviously be just as devastating. That’s why the U.S. Army has developed a Pelvic Protection System – dubbed “Kevlar boxers” or “combat underpants” by some soldiers – to protect dismounted soldiers patrolling Afghanistan roads.

The U.S. Army developed the Pelvic Protection System after taking a lead from British forces that employed “Blast Boxers” made by Cardiff-based military accessories provider BCB International. The U.S. version consists of two layers of protection – a Tier I protective under-garment – or “PUG” – and a Tier II protective outer-garment – or “POG.”

Worn like shorts, the PUG is worn under a soldier’s ACU (Army Combat Uniform) pants and can be worn over the top of, or in place of underwear. It has a breathable, moisture wicking material on the outer thighs and knitted Kevlar along the inner thighs to protect the fleshy parts of the thigh and the femoral artery. Additional knitted or woven Kevlar is located over the groin. The fabric has been tested to ensure it won’t melt or drip when exposed to extreme heat.


Do you want:

  • ad-free access?
  • access to our very popular daily crossword?
  • access to Incite Politics magazine articles?

Silver subscriptions and above go in the draw to win a $500 prize to be drawn at the end of March.

Not yet one of our awesome subscribers? Click Here and join us.

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.