No they shouldn’t

The Herald editorial today suggests that the Government should stay out of the rail debate for Auckland. Clearly the editorial writer this morning is Brian Rudman:

If the council can convince Aucklanders to stump up for it, the plan can be considered economic. We will not agree to pay for it unless we can be convinced enough of us will use it. It will be up to Mr Brown and his team to convince us. In taking on that task they have done the right thing. The Government should not get in their way.

Really?

Len Brown drew the government into the debate when he proposed 13 additional new taxes as means with which to pay for his train set.

The whole set up by Brown was flawed because it pre-supposes that teh Rail Loop is a good idea and will happen anyway. There should be another couple of option:

  • We don’t want the rail loop at all and so funding option are unnecessary
  • No to all of the above

By asking us to chose one makes it look like Aucklanders are happy to have the silly train loop…we are not.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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