Maybe Otago Could do This?

Perhaps Otago could have form a company and issue stock to solve their ills:

The fifth stock sale in team history closed at midnight Wednesday with the Packers raising almost half of the money needed for the Lambeau Field expansion that’s already underway.

Final sale numbers are not yet available, but more than 268,000 shares were sold at $250 apiece during the 12-week sale, contributing roughly $67 million in revenue toward the $143 million Lambeau project.

“For budgeting purposes, we looked at what we did last time and estimated conservatively at $25 million,” Packers President/CEO Mark Murphy said, referring to the 1997 stock sale’s proceeds. “When you step back from it, it far exceeded our expectations.”

In the first two days of the sale in early December, 185,000 shares were sold, as the convergence of the Christmas season and the team’s undefeated record at the time produced immediate demand. In the final weeks of the sale, regulatory clearance was gained to sell stock in Canada, leading to roughly 2,000 shares purchased across the border.

“It’s a tribute to the organization, the support of our fans, and the uniqueness of the Packers,” Murphy said. “I think that really appeals to people. You can’t say enough about how appreciative we are for the support.”

Wisconsin fans purchased approximately 50 percent of the shares in this sale, by far the most by one state but a lower percentage than in 1997. Illinois and California were next with 8.5 percent apiece, followed by Minnesota and Texas with 5 percent each.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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