Scrutiny of Unions

Looking at the publicly available financial information of New Zealand Unions some very interesting things spring to mind.

There is often a discrepency with what they say publicly and what the declare. Questions need to be asked, and we need to know if Unions are rorting their members like happened to the the Health Services Union members in Australia.

Health Services Union leader Jeff Jackson used union funds to pay for flights for his assistant and their partners to the wedding of one of their organisers, a damning Fair Work Australia report has found.

The report released yesterday finds more than 30 breaches of the law or union rules and reveals dysfunction in the organisation’s financial administration.
Among the findings were that Mr Jackson, the former Health Services Union Victorian branch secretary, improperly used union funds to pay for himself, assistant branch secretary Shaun Hudson and their partners to fly from Melbourne to Sydney for the wedding of a union organiser.

One thing is certain, the publicly claimed membership numbers and their dues don’t stack up with their accounts. Are Unions rorting their members like they are in Australia? And why haven’t the media here started looking?


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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