The Right to Die

 The Telegraph

A man in the UK has secured a judicial review of the law surrounding him having the “right to die”. He wants the right to end his own life, basically at the blink of an eye:

Locked-in syndrome sufferer Tony Nicklinson accused politicians of ignoring “one of the most important issues facing our society today” as he voiced his “delight” at winning the first stage of his right-to-die court battle.

Mr Nicklinson, a married father-of-two who communicates only by blinking or nodding after being left paralysed following a stroke, says he is “fed up” with his life.

He is asking for declarations that doctors can help him end his “intolerable” existence without facing a murder charge, saying it would be the “right and decent thing” to empower people to make such a choice.

A High Court judge ruled that his case could proceed to judicial review, despite arguments by the Ministry of Justice that it should be struck out because what Mr Nicklinson wants the courts to do should be a matter for Parliament.

Mr Nicklinson who sums up his life as “dull, miserable, demeaning, undignified and intolerable”, will now have his case heard fully later this year.

The 57-year-old welcomed the decision in a statement read out by his wife Jane, a former nurse.

He said: “I’m delighted that the issues surrounding assisted dying are to be aired in court. Politicians and others can hardly complain with the courts providing the forum for debate if the politicians continue to ignore one of the most important topics facing our society today.

“It’s no longer acceptable for 21st century medicine to be governed by 20th century attitudes to death.”

Mr Nicklinson, who lives in Melksham, Wiltshire, and has two grown-up daughters, suffered a stroke while on a business trip to Athens in 2005.

In a statement to the court he said: “I have no privacy or dignity left. I am fed up with my life and don’t want to spend the next 20 years or so like this.

“Why should I be denied a right, the right to die of my own choosing when able bodied people have that right and only my disability prevents me from exercising that right?”

I think they really need to make sure there is an agreed signal or something otherwise he could wind up dead just because he had a tic in one eye.


Do you want:

  • Ad-free access?
  • Access to our very popular daily crossword?
  • Access to daily sudoku?
  • Access to Incite Politics magazine articles?
  • Access to podcasts?
  • Access to political polls?

Our subscribers’ financial support is the reason why we have been able to offer our latest service; Audio blogs. 

Click Here  to support us and watch the number of services grow.

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

40%