Walk of Shame no more

The Telegraph

The UK Advertising Standards Authority has declared the Walk of Shame to have no shame what so ever:

In a ruling that suggests that society no longer judges women who have casual sex, the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) said that a Harvey Nichols advert showing women doing the so-called ‘walk of shame’ the morning after a night out was “unlikely to cause serious of widespread offence”.

‘Walk of shame’ is slang for people’s journey home after a one night stand.

The department store’s advert, which aired on the YouTube website in December, showed nine women in party dresses walking home at dawn after a night out.

Eight women were depicted in skimpy dresses looking dishevelled and embarrassed, and one of them wore ripped tights. The strapline ‘Avoid the Walk of Shame this Season’ then appeared, followed by a shot of a well-dressed woman – apparently a Harvey Nichols customer – returning home at dawn looking confident.

Four viewers complained that the advert – which was set to the song ‘Morning has Broken’ – was offensive because it reinforced negative stereotypes of women, and in particular those who chose to have casual sex. They also said that it was demeaning to women, while one viewer said that the ripped tights “implied sexual violence”.

Complainants also said that the advert suggested that lower class women who had one night stands should feel shame, while more wealthy women who behaved in the same way – such as the woman at the end of the advert – should feel proud.

However the ASA ruled that the advert did not cause harm or offence and was not socially irresponsible.

It dismissed Harvey Nichols’ claim that the women in the adverts had not necessarily had one night stands. The ASA said that by referencing the ‘walk of shame’ the “implication” of the advert “was that the women had had casual sex the previous night”.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.