NRA teaches the UN a lesson

Mail Online

The NRA are the worlds best political campaigners…they staunchly defend their members (I am one) rights. Well, they are widely being credited with tipping over a UN initiative:

The United Nations is set to introduce a treaty cracking down on the $60billion global business of illicit trading in small arms.

The move is aimed at curbing violence in some of the most troubled corners of the world, but has unsurprisingly ruffled feathers with pro-gun activists in the US, including those of the National Rifle Association.

They have denounced the treaty as a threat to their constitutional right to bear arms.

Think about those lines for a moment. The UN was wanting to crack down on “illicit trading” of small arms…hmmm…illicit means it is already illegal. The moves wouldn’t have done anything as there is already “illicit” trade happening…they really don’t care about the law in lawless countries. The NRA strongly opposed this UN direction and now an impasse has been reached effectively killing it off:

The Conference on the United Nations Arms Trade Treaty (U.N. ATT) has broken down and will not report a draft treaty to the member nations.

This is a big victory for American gun owners, and the NRA is being widely credited for killing the U.N. ATT.

For nearly 20 years, the NRA has worked tirelessly to warn American gun owners about the United Nations’ efforts to undermine the constitutional rights of law-abiding American gun owners by putting in place international controls on small arms.

NRA became a recognized Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) and has monitored all U.N. activities that could impact on our Second Amendment rights. As a result, NRA Executive Vice President Wayne LaPierre testified before the U.N. (2012 remarks2011 remarks) making it clear that the NRA would fight any international treaty that included civilian arms.

In any case the UN action will likely be overtaken by technology. A working assault rifle..at least a critical part of one has been made with a 3D printer.

Get ready. It’s now possible to print weapons at home.

An amateur gunsmith, operating under the handle of “HaveBlue” (incidentally, “Have Blue” is the codename that was used for the prototype stealth fighter that became the Lockheed F-117), announced recently in online forums that he had successfully printed a serviceable .22 caliber pistol.

Despite predictions of disaster, the pistol worked. It successfully fired 200 rounds in testing.

HaveBlue then decided to push the limits of what was possible and use his printer to make an AR-15 rifle. To do this, he downloaded plans for an AR-15 in the Solidworks file format from a site called CNCGunsmith.com. After some small modifications to the design, he fed about $30 of ABS plastic feedstock into his late-model Stratasys printer. The result was a functional AR-15 rifle. Early testing shows that it works, although it still has some minor feed and extraction problems to be worked out.

Good luck to the UN or anyone else controlling firearms now.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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