Public Broadcasting…no thanks

Liberty Scott

A proper explanation why politicians are crap at pretty much everything, but in this instance providing public broadcasting:

I’m resigned to free to air TV in NZ being braindead, because it’s what most people want most of the time.  There is better on Sky and some regional broadcasters.  There is more online and that is where the media is heading.

I don’t trust politicians to bring me better broadcasting, because I don’t trust them to buy me food, clothing or buy me healthcare or a pension.  Those who want better should support what is there now and if so inclined, make their own content.  It is remarkably cheap to do so given digital technology (none of which came from public broadcasters).

The coming years will continue the profound revolution in media that has been going on for the last 20 years, a revolution that is challenging existing free to air broadcasters and newspapers.   The ability to access content from all over the world and publish your own content is transforming media, discourse, journalism and starting to affect politics.
That is where the future is – not a small state owned TV channel, nor in considering ways to regulate one of the country’s most successful broadcasters (particularly when just about any way that a government might consider regulating it will breach the country’s WTO commitments on audio-visual services).


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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