Shaking up School governance

The Telegraph

In 1989 David Lange shook up the school system and governance of schools by largely implementing the recommendations of the Picot Taskforce Report. it is 23 years since then and perhaps it is time to revisit school governance again.

Governance is certainly an issue in the UK and Michael Gove is making moves and he makes no bones about who he holds accountable for failures in education:

He said: “There are factors acting as a drag on that change for the better.

“Actions by teachers – and some of those who claim to speak for the profession – which go against the grain of higher aspirations for all.

“Teaching union leaders who deny there is any such thing as a bad teacher who needs to go – and so hold back freedom and recognition for those good teachers who deserve our praise and promotion.

“Teaching union leaders who oppose the extra work involved in getting every child to read fluently at six.

“Subject association leaders – like the man in charge of the National Association for Teaching English – who argue that it is oppressive to teach children grammar.

“Professional leaders – in the unions and elsewhere – who object to being held to account objectively for getting children to learn. Union leaders who object to poor schools getting help from those with a track record of excellence because it offends their ideology.

“The message the country hears is that the unions care far more about wranglings between adults than about improvements for children.

“I believe that we can only overcome the corrosive culture of low expectations which still persists in too many of our schools by setting a higher bar, with harder exams, for all students.

“It is only when we have a system where we expect for all children what we would expect for our own that we have a dynamic which drives up attainment for the very poorest. If we settle for a system where forty per cent fail, then we will all fall behind. Our whole society is impoverished.”


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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