Focussing on things that matter, Ctd

While Labour continues to focus on a big fat German fraudster, the government keeps on keeping on focussing on the real things that matter….like the economy:

Higher tax revenue, lower core Crown expenses and a large fall in annual Canterbury earthquake expenses helped to halve the Government’s operating deficit before gains and losses to $9.2 billion in the year to 30 June 2012.

The Crown’s annual financial statements published today show the Government is continuing to manage its finances responsibly and getting on top of debt, Finance Minister Bill English says.

“It was important that we helped New Zealanders through the recession by maintaining government programmes and public services,” he says. “It was also important that we provided the financial resources needed to help the people of Canterbury after the earthquakes.

“That has meant running large deficits in recent years. However, that could not continue indefinitely. The consequences of too much government debt are all too clear in Europe and the United States, where we are seeing big cuts to public services and pensions, and higher taxes.

“The National-led Government does not want that for New Zealand. That’s why we’re running a balanced programme to build a competitive economy, to reduce the unsustainable growth in government spending of the previous decade, and to get back to surplus.

“The latest financial statements show the Government is making good progress, with the economy continuing to recover and public finances improving.”

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.