Greens propose updating Adoption laws

Kevin Hague continues to impress me. He calmly covered the issues in a constructive manner with ACC and now he has put forward a comprehensive bill to modernise out very outdated adoption laws.

People may ask why I care about adoption. Well, my sister is adopted, and my mother was godmother to two adopted twins. So i have a wee bit of an interest in adoption laws:

The Greens have drafted a bill to overhaul adoption laws and allow adoption by same-sex couples, saying legislation about to be debated by Parliament doesn’t guarantee New Zealand’s antiquated legislation will change.

The member’s bill by Kevin Hague would enable gay adoption, something already being considered in two Labour bills already before Parliament by MPs Jacinda Ardern and Louisa Wall.

Hague’s bill is the result of cross party work with National MP Nikki Kaye. Labour was part of that work until MP Jacinda Ardern pulled out of the group last year and drafted her own bill to overhaul adoption laws.

While Hague’s bill has to be drawn from the member’s ballot before it is debated by Parliament, Ardern’s bill is expected to have its first reading within the next month.

Hague today said the Greens would not support Ardern’s bill because it required the Law Commission, which reviewed the 1955 Care of Children Act in 2000, to draft a bill and then for the Minister of Social Development at the time to introduce that legislation.

Even in the best case scenario, under Ardern’s bill it would be two or three years before a law was drafted, he said.

“I don’t think the process adds any advantage. It’s sole advantage is that it is already on the order paper. We already have a bill.”

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.