The BBC is as bad as the Catholics

The Catholic Church have for years covered up their abusing priests, now revelations suggest that the BBC has a similar culture:

The head of Radio 1 was aware of sex abuse allegations against Sir Jimmy Savile in the early 1970s, according to a former colleague.

Rodney Collins, who was head of press for the BBC pop music station at the time, has disclosed that he looked into whether or not newspapers were investigating rumours about the DJ’s involvement with young girls.

He said he was asked to do so in 1973 by the late Douglas Muggeridge, then the Controller of Radio 1 and 2.

His claims put fresh pressure on the corporation, which has been accused of turning a blind eye to repeated claims of inappropriate behaviour by the eccentric presenter, who died last year aged 84.

In the past week 11 women have come forward to say that Savile forced himself on them when they were schoolgirls, some in BBC dressing rooms, with more details emerging in an ITV documentary on Wednesday night.

The BBC’s Newsnight pulled a similar programme last year, claiming it could not substantiate the allegations.

The BBC has said it is “horrified” by the claims and that its Investigations Unit is to work with police in looking for evidence, but insisted that “extensive searches” of old files have found no record of misconduct allegations against Savile.

But Mr Collins insisted: “For the BBC to say they weren’t aware of anything, they certainly were.”

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.