When Gotcha politics goes wrong

On the same day that National released their welfare initiatives and Labour had so much to talk about in an area they like to think they own, they instead launched a gotcha attack via their proxies in the media and online against john Key that looks like it has actually got their own leader.

David Shearer promised not to engage in gotcha politics and then ineptly launched into an attack based on pillow talk from his staffer Fran Mold.

The Labour Party’s GCSB leak has been revealed.

The partner of David Shearer’s chief spin doctor, former TVNZ political journalist Fran Mold, is a former spy – he left the organisation in March this year.

That’s where the party’s information has come from that when John Key was briefed at the GCSB in February, he spoke to the spies in a cafeteria.

Barry Soper is a little wonky in his analysis though because [redacted] no longer works at GCSB having left there for a job at Primary Industries. He is however very good friends with Agent “G” who must be sitting at his desk waiting for all hell to descend upon him wishing he had never met either [Redacted] or Fran.

For his party though David Shearer is either very stupid or has been set up. Because right now no one is ever going to trust him because he plays shameless politics with security agencies. Like Phil Goff before him he has blamed the agency and accused them of lying and worse of physically destroying evidence on Firstline this morning. We all know how that turned out for Phil Goff.

Shearer has shown himself unfit for office.

Do you want:

  • ad-free access?
  • access to our very popular daily crossword?
  • access to Incite Politics magazine articles?

Silver subscriptions and above go in the draw to win a $500 prize to be drawn at the end of March.

Not yet one of our awesome subscribers? Click Here and join us.

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.