I wonder why $0.99 Skin Cancer diagnosis isn’t reliable?

Stuff reports on a warning for people using an App to self-diagnose cancer:

Smartphone apps designed to detect skin cancer have been shown to be unreliable and could fool people into thinking a cancerous mole is benign, says new research published today.

And the Chicago researchers who tested the apps said people should not rely on them.

I would have thought common sense would have been sufficient here.

They needed research to figure this out?

The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center study, published in Online First, found that three out of four of the apps said 30 per cent of cancerous skin lesions were of no concern.

Researchers used 60 images of melanomas and 128 benign skin lesions to test four different apps.  

Of the 60 melanomas, 18 were incorrectly diagnosed as benign and one app only had a 6.8 per cent success rate of identifying melanoma.

Still, the really dumb people need protecting, if not just their cheque book.

There are more than 13,000 health care apps available and the mobile health app industry made an estimated $718 million worldwide, according to a recent report by Research2Guidance, a consulting firm.

The cost of the four apps in the study ranged from free to $5.29, a lot cheaper than a $50 doctor fee or $300 mole map, which Pearson said was why people might use them.

 

 


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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