Perhaps shaking the baby would have helped?

Jodi Noyce reports:

A few Sunday mornings ago, when the summer had started to kick in, my partner and I headed to our local cafe for breakfast. It was hot and we were hungry – we’d just spent the morning at the christening of a good friend’s first born.

Never go to a Christening on an empty stomach.

“Is that a child crying?” my partner asked me with a concerned look on his face. I replied yes but thought to myself, this wasn’t normal crying. This was a piercing, shrill cry and sounded like the child was in pain. I glanced around and everyone in the cafe looked disturbed.

A couple sat down at the empty table beside us but after hearing the crying, left and went to the cafe across the road. I asked my partner if we should do the same – and just as I did, the crying let up.

…  

After around 10 minutes of continuous crying, my partner had clearly had enough. “It’s one thing for a baby to cry but this is ridiculous.” Thinking that he wanted to leave without eating, I began to gather my things. But he had other ideas. “No one has said anything to them, so I am.”

He was too upset to listen to my suggestion to leave – and instead walked over to the parents of the toddler. “I’m sorry, but your child has not stopped crying since we got here,” he said. “Everyone in the café is upset by it. Can you either take your child for a walk or find another solution.

“This is my Sunday too.”

“Chill out mate”, came the father’s reply.

My partner walked back to our table. A few minutes later, the mother and her child began walking towards the door.

As they walked passed us, she turned to my partner. “We are leaving and you are a despicable human being.”

Once outside the door she mouthed the words “f*** you.”

Lovely.

A waitress, who regularly serves us, came over and asked if we were OK – it wasn’t the first time this family had been told to do something about their child.

“That child is a problem child,” she said. “She is always crying. Customers have told the family this before.” After apologising, she said that the cafe is often caught in the middle of these situations but can’t really say anything.

They can’t do anything about it?  Like hell they can’t.  They’re a bunch of cowards that should be thinking of all their other customers instead of the one that’s ruining it for everyone else.

 

 


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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