Rod Oram is no fan of Dotcom, hands out harsh medicine to the fat man

Rod Oram takes time out from lecturing at the Young Labour Summer School and gets right up Kim Dotcom and his fanciful claims in the Sunday Star Times, expect David Fisher to start running a twitter attack against him in short  order….or at the very least to spout forth arguments ion Kim’s behalf.

Dangerously for us, however, Kim Dotcom has plunged into this gap. The man and his business models are the absolute antithesis of what the internet and this country need.

He dangles a glittering prospect others have offered before: he says we could generate jobs, wealth and taxes if we turned ourselves into one of the world’s great data storage sites. After all, we have abundant, cheap and renewable electricity to power the servers. All we’d need is bigger cables to connect us with the world and a change of laws to make us the Switzerland of data secrecy.

He claims his new services, if they were based here, would within three years generate more traffic than the rest of NZ online activity combined. But everything is wrong about this proposition, from the economics to the practicality and morality.

So far Oram is the only media person to get up Kim Dotcom and called him on his bullshit, he goes further. 

A week ago he launched his first service, Mega, for storing and sharing files. It looks and works very similarly to his Megaupload site, which the US government closed down a year ago. The US is seeking Dotcom’s extradition to face charges that Megaupload was a tool for the theft of US$500 million of pirated films and music, which generated US$175m of criminal proceeds.

Mega has one main difference: all data on it will be encrypted automatically as users load their files. Mega’s owner and staff, not to mention governments and copyright holders, won’t be able to check what might be pirated.

Dotcom believes this will keep law enforcers off his back and his service running. After all, he insists, many technologies have dual purposes – they can be used for legal and illegal purposes. He makes scant effort, though, to support the good and stamp out the bad. He is escalating, not winning, his fight with copyright holders.

He is also causing trouble for himself by getting offside with some in the international tech community. Within days of Mega’s launch, encryption experts exposed numerous weaknesses in its systems. Dotcom has pledged to fix them. But given his history he will find it very difficult to make his service credible to legitimate users and acceptable to copyright holders.

Mega will be nothing but a safe haven for pedos and child porn merchants. I wonder what the FBI will think of his encryption, or the NSA which surely much be even now peering down the pipes into Mega. Certainly with the promise of tight encryption, the sickos who peddle child porn will be getting wood.

In coming months he will launch his next service, Megabox, for music. Users will either pay for downloads or agree to download Mega software. This will displace ads on other websites with ads on which Mega will collect revenues. Either way, Dotcom says, artists will get money for their music. Google will certainly test the practicality and ethicality of this, since Dotcom is targeting 10 per cent of its ad revenues. He will find it, and other ad services, formidable enemies.

Yeah good luck trying to take $3.7 billion of Google’s shareholders. Dotcon’s rationale is that it is ok, he will only be stealing off the big guys. Stealing is stealing nonetheless…try stealing off the mafia and running a defence that you are only stealing off of criminals…and see what that get’s you…I’d bet you’d get a nice place of concrete flippers.

People are starting to wake up to the bullshit and bravado from the Jolly Japing German.

http://youtu.be/gljVnNLWrQc


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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