Told you they’d start fighting back

Gingervitis is deadly…there should be something done about dangerous, soulless sufferers of Gingervitis.

Perhaps rounding them up and re-homing them in Palmerston North might best for us all before  something tragic happens:

A 16-year-old student who was teased by his California high school classmates for his red hair, social awkwardness and bookish appearance will be charged as an adult for allegedly wounding a classmate with a shotgun and trying to target another.

Bryan Oliver will face two counts of premeditated attempted murder and three counts of assault with a firearm in the attack Friday at Taft Union High School that left another 16-year-old wounded, the Kern County district attorney’s office said. Oliver was scheduled to be arraigned at 3 p.m. (local time). 

“It was just the factors of the case,” said Mark Pafford, the chief deputy district attorney, about the decision to charge Oliver as an adult. “The severity of the actions, the injuries to the victim, that a firearm was used. Those are the things we considered.”

The potential penalty for just one count of premeditated attempted murder with a firearm is 32 years to life, Pafford said. If he had been charged as a juvenile and convicted, he would be held until his 23rd birthday.

Oliver had been bullied by the two classmates he allegedly targeted, according to a witness who knows the teen.

“They called him a ‘ginger’ and said gingers don’t have souls,” said Morgan Alldredge, a friend of both Oliver and one of the targets, who was in the classroom during the shooting. “I was his friend. I don’t know why people picked on him. He was misunderstood.”


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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