Euphemism for the day: Irregular maritime arrivals

In the case of Australia, concerns over ‘unauthorised’ boat arrivals or ‘boat people’ (also referred to as ‘irregular maritime arrivals’) have occupied successive governments since the 1970s. However, many argue that the number of boat arrivals in Australia is very small in comparison to the significant flows of ‘unauthorised’ arrivals in other parts of the world over the last few decades.    —aph.gov.au

Well, sure.  Compared to the Iraqis fleeing their country before Desert Storm, or compared to the mess that’s Dafrur, I guess that would be true.

But that’s really just hiding the true problem among bigger numbers.

Australia publish  a quarterly report on their immigration problems.  In the latest one, IMAs (Irregular Maritime Arrivals, remember?) , presents some scary looking numbers:  

Non-IMA  Protection visa applications are typically lodged by air arrivals (but may include very small numbers of ship  stowaways or maritime crew).  IMA figures include all people who arrived on an irregular vessel.

Non-IMA
Protection visa applications are typically lodged by air arrivals (but may include very small numbers of ship
stowaways or maritime crew). IMA figures include all people who arrived on an irregular vessel.

I don’t think New Zealand wants any part of that problem.  Luckily we’re just a little too far away for anyone to strike out for NZ shores on a boat.

This is the make-up of nationalities that Australia is processing as IMAs

ASas

Our own government reports

Where refugees are marginalised – through negative media reporting, political antipathy, insecure legal status, a lack of educational and employment opportunities, and/or hostility from local communities – there is less integration. Those who feel threatened or excluded from the host society, instead of striving to belong, may seek to emphasise their difference through isolating themselves in their own communities and may also be more open to radical influences.

Yes, well, shit happens.  They may no longer be in fear for their lives, but that doesn’t mean you can insert them into New Zealand society

A Ms Quin commented on this issue as part of Waikato University research into this problem

Ms Quinn, who moved to New Zealand from the UK in 1980, says Kiwis should accept Somalis and other refugees from war-torn regions if for no other reason than humanitarian issues. “We do live in paradise here, and some people don’t – through no fault of their own. Many Somalis have seen people slaughtered or raped.”

She said there were several reasons New Zealanders struggled with accepting Somali people: Often orthodox Muslims were arriving into a secular culture which had little understanding of the Muslim religion; Somali people could be voluble, expressive and wore very colourful clothes, and their culture did not value shyness – and they come to a country full of self-effacing Kiwis. However, Somali people shared with Maori the importance of whanau, Ms Quinn said.

 


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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