Saudi Cleric’s fatwa: Burqas for babies


Meet Sheikh Abdullah Daoud.  He’s back in the news as a result of the reports on the torture, rape and murder of 5 year old Lama by her father Fayhan al-Ghamdi, as reported on earlier today.  

This genius has a solution for the problem of fathers being tempted to rape, torture and murder their own daughters:  Put them in a burqa.

A Saudi cleric who called for baby girls to wear burkas for their own safety has been subjected to a barrage of criticism on social media. The preacher’s remarks have been widely condemned for denigrating Islam, and as a breach of privacy.

Sheikh Abdullah Daoud made the remarks during an interview with Islamic Al-Majd TV last year, but video of the interview recently went viral on social media sites and became a topic of widespread debate and derision.

Daoud claimed that baby girls would be protected from abuse if they wore a full burka

Luckily, this isn’t finding fertile ground with the rest of his countrymen

Sheikh Mohammad al-Jjzlana, former judge at the Saudi Board of Grievances, said Daoud’s fatwa made Islam and Sharia law look bad.

Jjzlana urged people to ignore Daoud’s statement and any unregulated fatwas. He said it makes him feel sad anytime he sees a family veiling their baby, describing it as an injustice




Via, UPI, Al Arabia


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.