Steals car because of sore feet, runs from crash scene

Sadly a lot of the stories I’ve posted about dimwits have come from Southland, but some clowns just need their nose rubbed in it. Take the following expert in jackassery:

A teenager who stole a vehicle because his feet were sore, crashed it into another vehicle the next day.

Nicholas Folster, 18, appeared before Judge Raoul Neave in the Invercargill District Court yesterday and admitted two charges of driving recklessly causing injury, stealing a vehicle and failing to stop after an accident on December 30.

He was remanded on bail to March 22 for sentence.

Prosecutor Penny Stratford said Folster stole an unlocked car while walking on Winton-Wreys Bush Highway.

He drove it to Te Anau and the next morning to Invercargill. While in Tweed St he put the car into a low gear, causing smoke to come off the tyres and the car to fishtail, she said.

The car continued fishtailing for about 1 kilometre before Folster lost control, crossed the centre line, collided with another vehicle with two people in it and continued into a fence, Ms Stratford said.

Folster ran from the scene.

Both people in the other car were taken to hospital. One suffered bruising on her stomach and chest and a sore left foot and the other suffered a sore neck and leg, she said.

When spoken to by police, Folster admitted stealing the car and said he did it because he had sore feet. He also said he ran from the scene because the passenger of the other vehicle was angry, she said.

Glad his Farrar hurty heel-itis sore feet cleared up enough to run from the scene of the crime.

There’s an easy way to deal with scumbags leaving the scene of an accident on foot though:


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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