Explaining TV

This is perhaps the best explanation about broadcast television ever:

If you own a broadcast channel, your job is to develop as many shows as possible that attract a wide audience. The formal term for most of these shows is “produced for a mass audience” but the common term is “relentless crap.”

This compares with cable or subscription television: 

But if you own a cable channel, your first goal is to develop a handful of “hits” that get you on that bundle to get guaranteed monthly income from tens of millions of subscribers. The rest of your lineup can be cheap “Law & Order” and “House” reruns, for all you care. Ratings don’t matter as much if advertising doesn’t matter as much. America’s “best” shows — like “Breaking Bad” and “Mad Men” — are all ratings dogs, each struggling to get a Nielsen rating higher than 3. But it doesn’t matter, because AMC’s cost structure allows for a few elite shows, one huge show (“Walking Dead”), and a lot of reruns.

And if you have ever wondered by Sky’s bundles are so annoying:

Television audiences hate the cable bundle, because they think they’re paying for television they don’t want to watch. But they don’t often appreciate that (a) the bundle is created by media companies, not cable companies, and (b) it’s at least partially responsible for the golden age of television that we’re living through. It’s created a motivation for no-name cable companies to make great entertainment.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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