Gay people have no right to sit on the front benches in parliament and, if there at all, should sit in the back “or even behind a wall”.

So says Lech Walesa, Poland’s first democratic era President. As a result a protest from Poland’s gay and transexual MPs has manifested in the parliament:

Poland’s first openly gay and transsexual parliamentarians have taken seats on the front bench of the national assembly to protest against hostile remarks by former president Lech Walesa.

Walesa, the leading hero in Poland’s successful anti-communist struggle in the 1980s, said last Friday that gay people belonged on the back benches of parliament, or “even behind the wall”.

Lovely and from a person who stood for freedoms.

On Wednesday, Robert Biedron, a gay rights activist, and Anna Grodzka, who had a male-to-female sex-change operation, took seats in the front row of the assembly. Both are members of the progressive Palikot’s Movement party, and party leader Janusz Palikot arranged for the two to sit in, relinquishing his own seat to Biedron.

“Lech Walesa is an important symbol for us all and for the whole world,” Biedron told the Associated Press before attending the session. “I respect him and I’d rather he used other words – words of acceptance and of respect for other people.”

Walesa, a Roman Catholic and a father of eight, is known for his strong views and distinctive way of expressing himself.

Always the Catholics isn’t it?


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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