Sperm smuggling. Yes, really.

via aonghascrowe.com

via aonghascrowe.com

First it was drugs, then cell phones, now sperm.

For Palestinian prisoners held in Israeli jails, starting a family would normally be out of the question.

But a growing number are resorting to an innovative and clandestine way of doing just that, by smuggling out sperm from prison.

There are 4,700 Palestinian prisoners in Israeli jails, and the Israeli government does not allow conjugal visits for married inmates.

Al Jazeera’s Nicole Johnston reports from the occupied West Bank.

Conjugal visits are permitted in about half of Europe, a minority of US states, and find only sporadic support elsewhere.  Incidentally, your are more likely to have conjugal visits available to inmates in Spanish speaking countries.  (somewhat dated source)

So the question remains:  When a man is locked up in prison, should this mean the end of his ability to continue adding to his family?  New Zealand currently doesn’t support it.

Do you want:

  • ad-free access?
  • access to our very popular daily crossword?
  • access to Incite Politics magazine articles?

Silver subscriptions and above go in the draw to win a $500 prize to be drawn at the end of March.

Not yet one of our awesome subscribers? Click Here and join us.

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.