Aussie consumer watch dog more dog than watch

imagesThis story hit the news in Australia yesterday and was briefly mentioned during the day on radio news. No doubt the print media will pile in because it is fashionable to hit Sanitarium.

The consumer watchdog in Australia, Choice, launched an attack against Sanitarium, as groups like to do. The attack was apparently about what Choice called “shonky claims” about nutrition.

Several popular liquid breakfast products including Sanitarium’s Up & Go and Kellogg’s breakfast drinks make dodgy nutritional claims, consumer group Choice says.

“Shonky claims on liquid breakfasts such as ‘high in fibre’, ‘fibre for digestive health’, and ‘goodness of three grains’ is a cause for concern,” Choice spokesman Tom Godfrey said.

“Liquid breakfasts have on average 1.5% fibre, which is well below the 10 per cent benchmark for high fibre.

“It is grains away from the 39.5 per cent fibre offered by some bran cereals.”

Well it turns out that the only people making shonky claims are Choice.  

It seems they are confusing regulations in the new code which there is three years for implementation. All current standards are adhered to. Furthermore I understand that to get the level of fibre Choice is recommending you would need to eat 1 ½ loaves of multigrain bread a day! I Wonder what other problems that will cause!

Meanwhile Choice is being slammed in industry magazines for their wonky jihad.

Sanitarium has hit back at consumer watchdog Choice stating that its popular Up & Go liquid breakfast range is indeed a nutritious product.

Choice released a statement yesterday claiming that an independent investigation conducted by the watchdog found that many liquid breakfast lines, including Sanitarium’s Up & Go, made misleading claims regarding fibre content.

Sanitarium says that the current code of practice on nutrient claims state that a food product must contain no less than 3 grams of fibre per serve to warrant a ‘high in fibre’ claim, and that Up & Go contains 3.8 grams.

“Sanitarium Up & Go fibre content of 3.8 grams is well in excess of the Code of Practice requirement to enable a “high fibre” content claim,” said Michelle Reid, accredited practicing dietician and nutritionist for Sanitarium.

“If liquid breakfasts contained 20 percent fibre, as Choice proposes for a high fibre claim, there would be 50 grams of fibre per serve – which is almost double the recommended daily intake – and no doubt inedible! It would be like eating one and a half loaves of wholegrain bread a day.”

As is usual these days the Aussies get it wrong again.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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